Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://csirspace.foodresearchgh.site/handle/123456789/1335
Title: Acidification and starch behaviour during co-fermentation of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and soybean (Glycine max Merr) into gari, an African fermented food
Authors: Afoakwa, E. O.
Kongor, J. E.
Annor, G. A.
Adjonu, R.
Keywords: Souring
Acidification
Fermentation
Starch
Rheology
Cassava
Soybean
Fortification
Gari
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Informa UK Ltd
Citation: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 61(5), 449–462
Abstract: Changes in acidification and starch behaviour were investigated during co-fermentation of cassava and soybean into gari, an African fermented product. Non-volatile acidity, pH and starch content were evaluated using standard analytical methods. Starch breakdown and pasting characteristics were also analysed using a Brabender viscoamylograph. Fermentation caused significant variations in the pH, non-volatile acidity and starch concentration. The pH decreased with concomitant increases in non-volatile acidity during co-fermentation of the cassava dough. Soy fortification up to 20% caused only minimal effects on the pH, titratable acidity and starch content during the fermentation period. Starch content decreased from 69.8% to 60.4% within the 48 h fermentation time in the unfortified sample, with similar trends noted at all levels of fortification. Starch pasting characteristics showed varied trends in pasting temperature, peak viscosity, viscosity at 95 C and at 50 C-hold with increasing fermentation time and soybean concentration. Cassava could be co-fermented with soybean up to 20% concentration during gari processing without significant effect on its process and product quality characteristics
URI: https://csirspace.foodresearchgh.site/handle/123456789/1335
ISSN: 0963-7486
1465-3478
Appears in Collections:Food Research Institute

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